Urban utopias
This article is available also in Spanish here

These were the urban utopias that preceded us – Infographic

My list

The concept of the perfect city has evolved through history, but in many ways, its core basics remain unaltered.

Temples, providing divine protection

Frequent in ancient times, temples were built in order to be on the good side of the gods. Future favors depended on how many temples were built and the interaction with the faithful.

The relevance of public services

Baths, circuses, theaters, aqueducts, the sewage system, large avenues… Quality of life depended on public services that were not always available.

Walls: the bigger, the better

For centuries, the walled city was the utopia for many kingdoms. The perfect city was the one capable of resisting a siege.

Rational cities, at last!

Fully developed during the Age of Enlightenment, avenue urbanism gave birth to a new city that didn’t need walls.

One household, one gas pipe

The Industrial Revolution brought gas as a source of energy into our homes. The new "smart home" used gas for everything: from heating to coking and even lighting. Fires were assured.

Then came the traffic lights

The rise in vehicle traffic forced cities to rethink their road model. Innovations such as traffic lights and wider roads were the solution.

Sky is the limit

Steel and concrete made building skyscrapers much easier. Cities could look at the world from above, and keep setting new records.

Urban electrification

Electricity soon replaced gas as the main source of energy. Now the smart home was the one powered only by electricity. We began to dream.

Twice the lanes is not enough

The rural exodus made cities grow exponentially. The response was to add more lanes to our roads. Soon, even 14 lane highways were proposed, only to discover that this was not the right solution.

Sustainable cities

Goodbye, cars. We were wrong: the private car was not the way to go. We embraced higher urban density and public transportation as the right way to reduce our cities’ carbon print.

The smart city

Filling our cities with sensors has brought to life an incipient AI that can manage city services more efficiently.

Related content

Recommended profiles for you

AF
Abdurrahman faiz Faiz
Uin alauddin
Collage student
AD
Aashna Dodhia
KPMG
AH
Aaron Huang
SHANGHAI LONG-JOIN INTELLIGENT TECHNOLOGY INC.
LONGJOIN® Photocell Manufacturer engineer /photocell /zhaga book 18
AS
Abhas Sagar
Student in GGSIPU
I\'m in the last year of my 5 year B.Arch programme. I aspire to be an urban planner and designer.
XB
Xiao Bian
Renmin University of China & University of Groningen
AK
Abhishek khanna
Independent Consultant
Specialist Regenerative Responsive Sustainable Smart City solutions planning, Design, ITApplications
ON
ouqwf nasv
js
AP
Abbie Pokorny
Dentons LLP
Senior Associate
AA
Aamer Azeemi
Petrus Consulting LLC
Managing Consultant
Karolína Čuntalová
VUT
AN
ABASSI Narjess
Head Unit of Next Generation Network Engineering and Approval of Telecommunications Access Networks studies
Head Unit of NGN Engineering and Approval of \\nTelecommunications Access Networks studies
AB
Abebe Dress Beza
University of the Basque Country
I am an Erasmus Student in the Smart Cities and Communities (SMACCs) program
佳陶
佳 陶
同济大学
NN
Neo Natt
aitortilla books
AS
Aarti Shah
Co-REGEN
AA
Abdulrahman Abdulhak
SABSRE
Projects manager
AA
Abdulaziz Almogren
SILZ
MB
max burks
university
AK
Aashit Khant
Shashvat Corporation
Director of the Shashvat Corporation. One of the leading companies in Real Estate.
AD
Abhishek Dand
Adani ports
Sr. Engineer